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The latest news at CRESST

CRESST researchers publish well over 150 articles every year, primarily in distinguished peer-reviewed journals but also in more practice- or policy-focused publications such as Educational Leadership, Education Next, Phi Delta Kappan magazine, the American School Board Journal, and the National PTA's Our Children magazine. CRESST partners publish scholarly books and are regularly quoted for their expertise in America's newspapers such as the New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, or Chicago Tribune. Our researchers serve as editors, co-editors, and reviewers for a number of national journals including the journal Educational Assessment.

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Harnessing the Power of Crowdsourcing

CRESST Senior Researcher Girlie Delacruz recently shared the results of an innovative study on the use of crowdsourcing for educational research at the annual American Psychological Association convention. 

Using an open call to 'gamers' and 'educators,' Dr. Delacruz and fellow researchers Eva Baker and Greg Chung, found that crowdsourcing was a promising research mechanism when the task was effectively framed for gamers. 

The CRESST presentation, "Assessment and Game Design in the Wild: Harnessing the Power of Crowdsourcing," is available.  

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Delacruz Shares Expertise with Education Writers

At the recent Education Writers Association annual meeting, CRESST Senior Researcher Girlie Delacruz shared CRESST research on designing games and assessment for young children. 

Together with Eva Baker, Greg Chung, and other CRESST researchers, well designed games can help improve performance on science assessments for children as young as Kindergarten, says Dr. Delacruz.  

A full copy of Dr. Delacruz's presentation is available.

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Contextual Effects Research Presented at NCME

At the recent National Council on Measurement in Education (NCME) annual meeting, Dr. Ji Seung Yang and CRESST Co-Director Li Cai shared their recent efforts to develop a more efficient estimation method for contextual effects in a nonlinear multilevel latent variable modeling framework, with the primary goal of developing more efficient statistical estimation methods.

Both a paper and a full presentation are available.   

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Contextual Effects Research Presented at NCME

 

At the recent National Council on Measurement in Education (NCME) annual meeting, Dr. Ji Seung Yang and CRESST Co-Director Li Cai shared their recent study findings investigating contextual effects, with the primary goal of developing more efficient statistical estimation methods.

Both a paper and a full presentation are available.   

CircuitMan2013.jpg

Contextual Effects Research Presented at NCME

 

At the recent National Council on Measurement in Education (NCME) annual meeting, Dr. Ji Seung Yang and CRESST Co-Director Li Cai shared their recent study findings investigating contextual effects, with the primary goal of developing more efficient statistical estimation methods.

Both a paper and a full presentation are available.   

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CRESST Shares Future of Games, Learning and Assessment

In a recent presentation focusing on the future of games, learning, and assessment, CRESST Co-Director Eva Baker and Senior Researcher Julia Phelan shared their insight into the current landscape of Common Core assessments. 

Among the topics they covered were the technology and school infrastructure to support forthcoming consortia assessments. 

View a copy of the Baker and Phelan presentation or read a brief summary of the conference. 

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Games- What Did Students Really Learn?

The high motivational nature of games seems to make them well suited for both instruction and assessment. But how do you analyze a game so that it tells you what students learned while they played it?

CRESST researchers Deirdre Kerr and Greg Chung explored that question and others in their recent presentation at the American Educational Research Association annual meeting. 

Kerr and Chung also have a brochure related to their study, Using Analysis of Student Strategies to Improve Educational Video Game Design

Kerr also presented a related poster, Student Perception of Math Content in an Educational Video Game

 

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CRESST Study Supports Value of Formative Assessment in Science

in a presentation at the American Educational Research Association, Yunyun Dai, Joan Herman, and Ellen Osmundson presented findings from their CRESST study of an elementary school science formative assessment program.

The researchers found that high quality formative assessment tools not only improved students' science learning but increased teachers' science content knowledge. 

According to senior researcher Yunyun Dai, their study underscores the value of quality, curriculum embedded, formative assessment tools in science. 

Download their presentation, Formative Assessment in Elementary Science: A Multi-level Path Analysis

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Using Ontologies for Learning and Assessment

In a recent presentation at the American Educational Research Association meeting, Eva Baker and Girlie Delacruz explained how ontologies can be used to measure the Common Core State Standards, and to guide learning game assessments as well as professional development. 

View their presentation, Learning and Assessment Ontologies of Cognitive Processes.  

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CRESST Co-Director Li Cai at Beijing Normal University

More than 100 faculty and students from across China recently attended a short Item Response Theory course taught by CRESST Co-director Li Cai.

Organized by the Center for National Assessment of Education Quality (NAEQ), the course was co-sponsored by Beijing Normal University, East China Normal University (Shanghai) and the Institute of Education Sciences of China. 

A link in Chinese is available on the NAEQ web site.